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Sharks - Free Sample

WHO IS GOING TO PROTECT THE SHARK FROM MANKIND? Great white sharks are seriously threatened with extinction worldwide through overfishing and are on the Red List. Up to 95 % of the stocks have already been eradicated in certain regions. According to a study conducted by Julia Baum and Ransom Myers, the bycatch of great white sharks in the Northwest Atlantic regressed by 79 % between 1986 and 2000. Still, longline fisher-men had caught 142 sharks as bycatch in two regions between 1986 and 1989. In 4,200 sets, no great white sharks were caught within a five-year period thereafter. The decline amounts to 89 % in the Adriatic, with the number dropping by 94 % off South Australia. While observing sharks swimming freely off South Australia in 2003, every third fish had a hook with a leader in its mouth or showed other signs of unpleasant contact with humankind. Tagging studies then reflected a 6 % return rate. Scientists call this "alarmingly high", since all of these sharks wound up as dead bycatch during longline and net fishing. Despite this alarming biodiversity loss, undiscerning trophy hunters still exist among the anglers. According to information provided by the biologist Ian K. Fergusson, they invest great amounts of money to catch a great white shark just to get to its dentition. Anglers would kill dozens of sharks worldwide just for this purpose. These hotspots include certain coastal areas in northern and cen-tral Chile as well as Baja California. Tagging and release activities occur off South Africa. $ 800 FOR A TOOTH Commercial fishermen in particular have no reason to unhook live sharks. Great white sharks dentition can bring in up to $ 50,000, the smaller ones are sold for $12,500-$15,000. According to the International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources, single large teeth cost $ 600-$ 800. Nevertheless, even baby shark dentition has market value: Small great white sharks often wind up in the fishermen’s’ nets in Mazara del Vallo in Sicily. As desirable bycatch in any case, as even these smaller jaws bring in money. Great white sharks are now protected by South Africa, Namibia, the USA, Australia and New 49


Sharks - Free Sample
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